Concerning Apostolic Authority and Demonic Possession

It’s a very telling sign of the times that in the past year, Satanists are now openly conducting “black masses”. First was the one a few months ago in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and this Saturday there is one scheduled in a civic auditorium in Oklahoma City, where a consecrated host was to be used until the Archbishop filed a lawsuit against the Satanic church to recover it.

A black mass is an “inversion” of the Catholic mass. It should be somewhat shocking to us that some Satanists have more faith in the Real Presence than Catholics do; a black mass isn’t truly one without a consecrated host. The demons who surround these Satanists know what they are doing and they know who and what they attack by what they do.

This should tell us something about Catholicism. When Satan or one of his minions attempts to mock Christ, their primary action is not to take the Bible and stomp on it. They don’t steal water from the Baptist church and pee in it. They don’t abscond with tracts from the Jehovah’s Witnesses and deface them. They don’t sneak into Mormon temples and make off with their special garments for use in Satanic rituals.

Satanists steal the Eucharist, the Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, which they desecrate in a variety of ways during their “black mass”. 

Satan, his demons, and those people he imprisons to serve him on earth know that the Church has the authority to send evil back to Hell. Satan and his demons must respect the Church’s authority, because her authority comes from Jesus himself.

14785140495_f9104640ed_oIn Matthew 16:19, Jesus gives authority over his Church to St. Peter, the first pope: “Whatever you bind on Earth shall be bound in heaven; and whatever you loose on Earth shall be loosed in heaven.” Jesus gives the power to all the apostles at 18:18: “Amen, I say to you, whatever you bind on Earth shall be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on Earth shall be loosed in heaven.”

Jesus “cast out the spirits with his word, and he healed all that were sick” (Matthew 8:16). Sometimes Jesus exorcised from a distance (Matthew 15:22; Mark 7:25). Sometimes the demons recognized Him as “the Holy One of God” (Mark 1:24). He gave the Apostles the authority to cast out demons in His name. (Matthew 10:1 and 8; Mark 6:7; Luke 9:1; 10:17).

Consider this article concerning Tulsa exorcist Monsignor Patrick Brankin, who was appointed the exorcist for the Diocese of Tulsa about four years ago. Before he was appointed, he was asked to investigate a case because the diocese “was unable to find an exorcist to handle it”. Msgr. Brankin went to visit the afflicted person “even though he had not yet been appointed as an exorcist.” On the first visit:

He found the person crouched in a corner of a room.

Brankin said the demon in the person immediately recognized him as a priest, without looking at him, and pronounced smugly that it knew Brankin had not been given the authority to exorcise it.

That scared me,” Brankin said. [I’ll bet it did. Imagine sharing a room with a powerful, unknown malevolence that knows there’s nothing you can do.]

Months later, after undergoing exorcism training in Rome, working with an experienced exorcist, and being “given faculties” (commissioned) as an exorcist, Brankin returned. This time, he said, the demon said it knew he had been given faculties and feared him.

The victim was successfully exorcised and is living a healthy Christian life, Brankin said.

Demons don’t fear priests on their own; but a priest who acts under the authority of his bishop — a successor of the Apostles — is to be feared, because it is the same authority that Jesus gave and it can send a demon straight back to Hell.

If Authority granted by Jesus to the Church compels obedience by demons and Satan himself, what can we say when tasked with obedience to the Church ourselves? Shall we dissent? Shall it be the same “Non serviam” uttered by Lucifer?

In contrast to angels and demons (i.e., fallen angels), we humans are capable of disobeying God and the authority granted His Church, because God gives us that freedom. But He gives us freedom so that we might “choose the good”; He will hold us accountable for how we use the freedom He gives.

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